$16.6 million awarded for Mozambique maternal health project

July 11, 2017

A SPHERU faculty-led project, aiming to reduce maternal deaths in Mozambique, received $16.6 million over the next five years from Global Affairs Canada on July 5.

SPHERU director Nazeem Muhajarine is co-leading a project, aiming to reduce maternal deaths in Mozambique. The project received $16.6 million for the next five years from Global Affairs Canada on July 5
SPHERU director Nazeem Muhajarine is co-leading a project, aiming to reduce maternal deaths in Mozambique. The project received $16.6 million for the next five years from Global Affairs Canada on July 5

SPHERU director Nazeem Muhajarine and project director Denise Kouri are leading a team of Saskatoon leaders and university researchers, including SPHERU’s Sylvia Abonyi, to improve health services for women and approaching barriers that prevent women’s access to care in Mozambique. The team is partnering with national and provincial health ministries in Mozambique.

Mozambique has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world – 489 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2015.

A team of 25 U of S undergraduate and graduate students in medicine, nursing, nutrition, and physiotherapy, will be working on the project, aimed to improve birth conditions in 20 rural communities in five health districts. The project will:

  • Train more than 1,000 new health care workers, to improve practitioner’s training and responses to women’s needs in maternity clinics.
  • Hire about a dozen staff members and consultants, five community workers in communities to educate people about gender equity, women’s sexual and reproductive rights, and empower women to use health facilities.
  • Educate youth about gender equity and improve rights and health of adolescent girls by visiting schools with workers and health ministry staff.
  • Purchase three ambulances for district hospitals, and 20 specially equipped off-road vehicles in the communities.
  • Create a supportive network between local midwives, traditional healers and women’s leaders and engage in reaching women will receive skilled birthing care with little delay.
  • Build five maternal clinics and renovate five existing clinics.
  • Build 10 waiting houses, so women nearing their due date will be relocated close to a hospital.
  • Determine if waiting homes are effective in delivering better outcomes for women.

For more information on the project, check out this video with footage from Mozambique.

Full U of S press release 

Article in the Star Phoenix


 

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