Poster promotes Smart Cities project to Parliament

March 18, 2014

MPs and senators recently had the chance to learn about how a city’s built environment can influence children’s activity levels.
SPHERU’s Dr. Nazeem Muhajarine and the Smart Cities, Healthy Kids team were invited to submit a poster about the study for a kiosk-style event, Feb. 24, in Centre Block on Parliament Hill.

Hon. Yonah Martin, Deputy Leader of the Government in the Senate, Dr. Nazeem Muhajarine and Hon. Kelvin Ogilvie, senator, Government of Canada.
Hon. Yonah Martin, Deputy Leader of the Government in the Senate, Dr. Nazeem Muhajarine and Hon. Kelvin Ogilvie, senator, Government of Canada.

The event, Building a Stronger Future for Canadian Children & Youth through Social Innovation, was sponsored by ResearchImpact-RéseauImpactRecherche.

“There was a steady flow of senators and some members of Parliament,” Muhajarine says. “Many of them stopping to really learn about our work in Saskatoon.”

He met with good response from the approximately twenty Parliamentarians he spoke to during the afternoon. “One member of parliament from Toronto region, in particular, showed interest in visiting Saskatoon to learn what we are doing ‘right’ here,” he says.

The Smart Cities poster, in both official languages, summarizes the research opportunity for the project – in this case, low levels of physical activity, an important cause of child obesity – among children and how this might be influenced by the design of a city. The poster emphasizes the impact of our research and how we are sharing findings with our partners to help create a city that encourages people to live more active lives, both for personal and environmental health. A two-page summary of a research article was also produced to provide more details.

SPHERU represented the University of Saskatchewan, joining six other universities from across the country at the event: Memorial, York, Guelph, Wilfrid Laurier, Kwantlen Polytechnic and Victoria. The posters examined a range of issues, such as bullying and abuse prevention, better home supervision for two- to five-year-old children and promoting mental health among Inuit youth by teaching traditional knowledge.

ResearchImpact-RéseauImpactRecherche is a pan-Canadian network of universities committed to maximizing the impact of academic research for the social, economic, environmental and health benefits of Canadians.


 

Back to Archived News