The determinants of TB transmission in the Canadian-born population of the Prairie provinces

Last Updated: December 20, 2012

Sylvia Abonyi, PhD (Co-Investigator)

Despite a known cure, TB continues persists as an international public health crisis. In Canada, the disease disproportionally affects First Nations people and the foreign-born. On the Prairies, rates are 30 times higher in First Nations than for the rest of the Canadian-born population, and repeated outbreaks in reserve communities have put elimination efforts back decades. 

This study reflects a region-wide, multifaceted and programmatic approach to informing TB elimination strategies. It has the potential to influence social determinants of health in marginalized communities, provide impetus for improved outcomes for Aboriginal people and explore a regional model of coordinated activity, by translating the results into practical solutions for those who need the most help.

Goals / Outcomes: This project, led by Richard Long at the University of Alberta, proposes a detailed study of the determinants of TB transmission in the Canadian-born population of the Prairie provinces with two main objectives: to investigate the stability of the host-pathogen relationship within global migrations patterns on the prairies; and to add depth to the retrospective data by conducting semi-structured interviews with all consenting Canadian-born adult TB cases diagnosed on the Prairies over two years.

Funder: Canadian Institutes of Health Research Operating Grant